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ABAPer seeking functional career

I have been working as an ABAPer for the past year in a big consultancy company. I have a BS (Comp science), 4-year degree course. I have a total of 5 years work experience. I am 28 years old.

I have been working as an ABAPer for the past year in a big consultancy company. I have a BS (Comp science), 4-year degree course. I have a total of 5 years work experience. I am 28 years old.

For the first 3 years I worked as a Web consultant in a Web solutions company where I used to make business proposals,...

project plans and site maps. I also used to work with Adobe Photoshop, Dream Weaver, html, JavaScript, jsp, servlets, and Visio, MS project. Then I was in between jobs for one year.

Since last year I have been working as an ABAPer where my company has given me in-house training. Basically, I am not having fun with coding. I do it, but I am not good in it. Although I am a computer science grad, I have not done much coding in life so maybe the inclination is not towards that.

I am enjoying being in SAP and would like to remain in SAP only. I was thinking of going for training in SD module. As an ABAPer I have worked with HR, SD, CS modules. But after going through some tips at this place, I am thinking maybe the right thing will be to do BW, as it is in between functional and technical and I do not have a management degree and I do not have module industry experience to support. So I am a bit scared that I will end up losing everything. What do you recommend?

It takes guts to admit you're not good at something -- in your case, coding -- but that's a great starting point for the next stage in your career. Your knowledge of coding is helpful, but now you can try to shift to a functional area that plays to your strengths. I like the idea of BW, because it is, as you pointed out, an area where you can draw on technical and functional skills. BW also spans so many SAP products and modules that it may give you a number of intriguing options to look into. I'd go for it. Don't worry too much about "losing everything." Having a good career means taking calculated risks from time to time. Believe it or not, the biggest career risk is often sticking with your guns for too long. Be proactive and you should land on your feet, even if some of the choices you make don't pan out.
This was last published in December 2004

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